Paul Atterbury is coming to Letchworth 
Garden City

On 26th April at 7:30 p.m. the Letchworth Garden City Society is promoting a public lecture by Paul Atterbury, known to many as one of the experts on BBC TVís Antiques Roadshow.


 
 
 
 

Paul specialises in the art, architecture, design and decorative arts of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and the subject of his illustrated lecture, "Rural Idyll or Suburban Fantasy Ė the Arts and Crafts Movement before the First World War" will link his expertise with the architectural and design ideals of the foundation and early years of Letchworth Garden City,
 

The lecture, appropriately, will be held in the ballroom of the Spirella Building which was built as a model factory, the first two parts of which was finished by 1914.
 
 

Tickets, priced at £5, are available from the Plinston Hall or by post from the Letchworth Garden City Society, 33 Lammas Way, Letchworth Garden City, SG6 4LN


 
Trained initially as a graphic designer, he later studied art history and then worked for Sotheby Publications, as a historical advisor for Royal Doulton and then as editor of Connoisseur magazine. Since 1981 he has been a freelance writer, lecturer, broadcaster and exhibition curator, in this capacity usually for the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. His recent exhibitions there include Pugin: A Gothic Passion (1994) and Inventing New Britain: The Victorian Vision (2001).

Paul has written or edited over thirty books, mostly on ceramics, but he is also known for his travel writing, and for books on railways and canals.

For the last twelve years he has been a member of BBC TVís Antiques Roadshow team of experts, working usually in the miscellaneous section which gives him ample opportunity to explore the antiques and collectables of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. During this time he has taken part in over a hundred Roadshows and has also appeared regularly on the Great Antiques Hunt, the Antiques Show and on Hidden Treasures on BBC Radio Four.

Over the last thirty years, Paul has given over 2000 lectures on many aspects of the art, architecture and design history of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. He has lectured to universities and colleges, antiques societies and collectorsí clubs, NADFAS groups, auction houses and galleries all over Britain, in the United States and Canada, in the Netherlands and in Australia. He also lectures for the National Trust, on cruises for P&O and other shipping lines, for Christieís Education and for the Victoria and Albert Museum. On a lighter vein he gives lunch and after dinner talks.

Paulís pleasures include walking and cycling, the enjoyment of landscape and architecture, railways, France, his garden and his two daughters. He lives in Dorset.

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